Caring for children around the world

A doctor holds a stethoscope to a globe

At Boston Children’s Hospital, we believe that all children deserve the same opportunity to live a healthy life, no matter where they are born. Boston Children’s Global Health Program helps solve pediatric global health care challenges by transferring our expertise through long-term partnerships with scalable impact.

Here are just a few examples of the ongoing work our cardiac clinicians are involved in to care for children around the world. …Read More

A film called ‘Squint’ will open your eyes to the power of strabismus surgery

The film "Squint" follows six patients who undergo strabismus surgery.
The short film “Squint” follows six patients who undergo strabismus surgery with Dr. David Hunter of Boston Children’s Hospital. Click here to watch on YouTube.

When Dr. Bernard Dib was medical student, he was struck by the impact that Dr. David Hunter had on patients who visited him for strabismus (crossed eye) surgery.

“I saw people from all over the world thanking him for changing their lives,” Dib says, who rotated electively into Hunter’s clinic as part of his medical school program. “Adults would say that they had a crossed eye for years and their doctors hadn’t ever said that surgery was an option for them.”

Hunter, who is ophthalmologist-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, is not only an expert at performing surgery to correct crossed eyes in children but also in adults. …Read More

Does sports specialization lead to increased injury rates in youth?

Kocher sports specialization and injury risk Notes blog

Sports specialization has become increasingly common amongst young athletes, as have the rates of both orthopedic injuries and major injuries such as ACL tears. These concerning trends are not coincidental, reports Mininder Kocher, MD, M.P.H, an orthopedic surgeon and the associate director of Boston Children’s Sports Medicine Division, in a recent presentation to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS).

…Read More

Notes from a nurse on the stem cell transplant unit

Stem cell transplant nurse with patient
Colleen caring for a child on 6W

I have worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for the last 10 years, the first two as a co-op and the last eight as a staff nurse — all on 6W. I just love this floor. We’re a small, 14-bed unit that provides longer-term care for children undergoing bone marrow transplants. We see different types of leukemia and other cancer and blood disorders such as neuroblastoma, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. We also see other genetic, metabolic and hematologic diagnoses like CVID, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, SCID, adrenoleukodystrophy and sickle cell disease, some of which we treat with gene therapy. …Read More