Author: Connor Ertz

Expert’s corner: Caring for labral tears in young athletes

Hip labral tears lead image Young-Jo Kim

Labral tears are one of the most common hip injuries in young athletes and can be a result of acute injury to the hip, an underlying anatomical issue that damages the labrum or in some cases, both. Treatment of labral tears ranges from rest and physical therapy to arthroscopy to open surgery. So how do you know what course of treatment is right for each patient?

Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD, a pediatric and young adult orthopedic hip specialist at Boston Children’s Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, discusses the causes of labral tears and his philosophy for treatment of this injury in young athletes.

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Preventing ACL injuries in female athletes through neuromuscular training

acl injury prevention notes lead image

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are on the rise, with about 350,000 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction surgery in the U.S. each year — and young athletes being the fastest growing patient population. Despite advances in ACL reconstruction, the risks of re-tear and future osteoarthritis are still major areas of concern. With this in mind, many institutions have increased clinical and research efforts for ACL injury prevention — a significant area of focus for The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention at Boston Children’s Hospital. …Read More

Caring for the female athlete: 5 clinical strategies

lead image caring for female athlete blog soccer

Since the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, the number of girls competing in high school sports has increased from 295,000 to nearly 3.2 million — with more women playing collegiate sports than ever before.

As these numbers continue to rise, and girls and young women become more empowered through sports, awareness of health issues specific to female athletes has become increasingly important. One issue, the Female Athlete Triad (Triad), has gained increasing awareness as more athletes have come forward about their struggle with the condition.

Dr. Kathryn Ackerman, medical director of Boston Children’s Female Athlete Program, offers the following clinical strategies for avoiding the Triad and keeping athletes healthy.

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Expert’s Corner: Caring for patellofemoral instability in athletes

patellofemoral instability lead image

Dislocation or subluxation of the patella or “kneecap” is a common acute injury for young athletes, especially in sports and activities such as basketball, football, lacrosse, gymnastics and dance. These injuries may be routinely observed in clinic, and depending on severity, may warrant a referral to a pediatric orthopedic specialist.

The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to both the condition in which an individual experiences a traumatic dislocation of their patella, and the general instability that a patient can feel or a physician may observe upon examination. In both cases, there are observations that may be made or treatments that can be provided that may reduce the risk of a dislocation event occurring in the future, as well as protect a young athlete from further damage.

Notes talked to Matthew Milewski, MD, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in Boston Children’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, about how to best care for young athletes with patellofemoral instability.

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