Author: Ellen Greenlaw

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Latest in diagnosis and treatment

Q&A about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with Partha Ghosh, MDDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy, affecting nearly 16 of every 100,000 live male births in the United States. It causes progressive muscular damage and degeneration, which results in muscle weakness, loss of ambulation, motor delays, cardiomyopathy and reduced respiratory function. …Read More

Rethinking fever: New study redefines body temperature

Researchers at Boston CHildren's Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator take new look at body temperature.
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Your first patient of the day presents with a sore throat and a temperature of 99.5 degrees. Although a little higher than normal, it’s not technically a fever, right? Jonathan Hausmann, MD, a rheumatologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, might disagree.

Hausmann, Fatma Dedeoglu, MD, and their colleagues from the Boston Children’s Hospital Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator, recently published a study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine that they hope will begin a larger dialogue among physicians and others about normal body temperature and the definition of fever. …Read More

Caring for children around the world

A doctor holds a stethoscope to a globe

At Boston Children’s Hospital, we believe that all children deserve the same opportunity to live a healthy life, no matter where they are born. Boston Children’s Global Health Program helps solve pediatric global health care challenges by transferring our expertise through long-term partnerships with scalable impact.

Here are just a few examples of the ongoing work our cardiac clinicians are involved in to care for children around the world. …Read More

Tuberous sclerosis: Clinical clues for early diagnosis

A scan of the brain of a tuberous sclerosis patient.

Tuberous sclerosis is a rare neurological condition characterized by benign tumor growth in various parts of the body. It often affects the brain, eventually causing epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. One challenge has been diagnosing the condition in infants, as they often don’t present with many clinical signs. However, a recent study published in Pediatrics has shed some light on early manifestations of this condition that may help lead to earlier diagnosis — and possibly earlier and more aggressive treatment.

To better understand clinical clues that may be seen in pediatric practice, Notes sat down with principal investigator of the study, Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, director of the Translational Neuroscience Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. He and his team in the Tuberous Sclerosis Program at Boston Children’s follow about 300 children with the condition. …Read More

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