Stories about: CME

Cerebral palsy: How a team approach benefits spasticity

two children with spasticity from cerebral palsy
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: DAVID CHRISOM/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Cerebral palsy (CP) is an umbrella term that can refer to several different types of brain injury and that can affect many aspects of a child’s health. For these reasons, CP is best treated by a team of clinicians from multiple disciplines, who can address the full array of related concerns. In the Cerebral Palsy and Spasticity Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, patients receive care from multiple providers in one day, which makes managing care easier on families and encourages collaboration and communication between caring physicians. …Read More

Multidisciplinary care to treat severe asthma

Multidisciplinary care for severe asthma

The Severe Asthma Program at Boston Children’s Hospital provides care to children and young adults with severe persistent asthma who have difficulty with disease management or chronic systemic steroid use. “We’ve developed a one-stop shop for the highest risk, highest cost, highest morbidity population of pediatric asthma,” says pulmonologist Jonathan Gaffin, MD, MMSc, who conceived of the program after witnessing hundreds of patients crossing between Boston Children’s Division of Pulmonary Respiratory Diseases and Division of Allergy and Immunology…Read More

In the pipeline: New therapies to manage severe therapy-resistant asthma

Pediatric Asthma - Girl blowing a dandelion

Over seven million children in the U.S. have been diagnosed with asthma. Many patients only experience mild, intermittent symptoms and can be treated symptomatically with medicines like Abluterol. Most of the remaining patients can achieve good asthma control by using daily medicines to decrease inflammation in the lung.

However, about 10 percent of children with asthma have difficult-to-treat disease. The challenge is identifying new therapies for these patients so they may live free of daily symptoms or the fear of exacerbations.

…Read More

Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) in children: It takes a village

VADs-pediatric-conference-heart-failure
A closeup look at a ventricular assist device for children

Children with end-stage heart failure now have more options than ever before. When they have no other medical or surgical options to treat their heart failure,  they may be evaluated for a ventricular assist device, or VAD, that can help support their hearts until heart transplant.

As recently as 15 years ago, these devices were a rarity in pediatric hospitals — and they surely weren’t portable for use outside of the hospital setting! But thanks to new technologies that make living life at home and at school possible for children with VADs, an entire new field of care management is emerging.  The newer VADs are mechanical heart pumps implanted inside the body that are electrically powered, either by batteries or being plugged into the wall. …Read More