Stories about: Expert’s Corner

Blended diets offer benefits for children with feeding tubes

blender with food in it
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

For years, the standard practice for children with feeding tubes has been to provide them with commercially available formula as a source of complete nutrition. While some children have no difficulty tolerating these formulas, others may experience problems such as significant vomiting, diarrhea, retching or growth issues. For these patients, a blended diet may offer a number of benefits. …Read More

Evaluating tracheomalacia: Preventing misdiagnosis

doctor diagnosing tracheomalacia
IMAGE: ADOBE STOCK

The patient is back in your office with another bout of recurrent pneumonia — the third time this year. At 7 years old, he can’t wait to join his school’s soccer team, but his parents report that he gets winded easily. Does he have asthma? Or could his symptoms indicate another problem with his airway?

Symptoms such as noisy breathing, a barking cough, and frequent respiratory infections can signal tracheomalacia (also known as tracheobronchomalacia), says Russell Jennings, MD, surgical director for the Esophageal and Airway Treatment Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. In this condition, the airway narrows or collapses when a child breathes, leading to symptoms such as noisy breathing, a barking cough, recurrent pneumonia and cyanosis. …Read More

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Latest in diagnosis and treatment

Q&A about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with Partha Ghosh, MDDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy, affecting nearly 16 of every 100,000 live male births in the United States. It causes progressive muscular damage and degeneration, which results in muscle weakness, loss of ambulation, motor delays, cardiomyopathy and reduced respiratory function. …Read More

Concussions: Treatment and return-to-play guidelines

Dr. O'Brien concussions athletes lead image
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

The end of summer and beginning of fall marks a time when physicians and athletic trainers begin to see a rise in concussions from athletes competing in both soccer and football. Though the football-concussion link is well-known, soccer also carries a significant risk for athletes.

In soccer, concussions are often the result of head-to-head contact or head-to-ground contact after an awkward fall. With players constantly leaping into the air to compete for lofted balls, it’s not surprising that these types of concussions regularly occur. Michael O’Brien, MD, director of the Sports Concussion Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital, details the updated protocols for return to play after concussion and what physicians and trainers should be aware of during the soccer season.

…Read More