Stories about: Global Health

HIV and AIDS in Africa: Continuing the conversation through music

HIV and AIDS awareness concert in Zambia
“Worth More” concert in Zambia, Africa hosted by Boston Children’s Global Health Program

Today is World AIDS Day. The number of people living with HIV in the world is roughly equal to the population of Canada. HIV still disproportionately affects Africa — of the 37 million people globally who are living with HIV, 19.6 million live in eastern and southern Africa. …Read More

Why breastfeeding matters for mothers and children (and families) everywhere

Baby touching mother's face while breastfeeding

The recent attempt by U.S. representatives to the World Health Assembly to reduce support for global infant nutrition guidelines represents a new low in promoting global public health. World Breastfeeding Week gives us reason to review hard facts and real news about how and why to support nursing mothers and their infants. …Read More

Caring for children around the world

A doctor holds a stethoscope to a globe

At Boston Children’s Hospital, we believe that all children deserve the same opportunity to live a healthy life, no matter where they are born. Boston Children’s Global Health Program helps solve pediatric global health care challenges by transferring our expertise through long-term partnerships with scalable impact.

Here are just a few examples of the ongoing work our cardiac clinicians are involved in to care for children around the world. …Read More

In Myanmar, oncology expertise travels from nurse to nurse

Image of global health team with nurses in Myanmar Through the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Global Health Initiative and World Child Cancer, oncology nurse Amy Federico, RN, CPNP, had the opportunity to travel to Yangon, Myanmar, to share her oncology expertise with the staff at Yangon Children’s Hospital. Amy’s interest in global health began eight years ago, but the trip to Myanmar in October 2017 strengthened her commitment to share her knowledge across borders. Amy, who is a nurse practitioner specializing in care of patients with solid tumors at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, reflects on her experience abroad:

My interest in global health care has developed over the past eight years since I started attending the Society of International Oncology Pediatric annual conferences. So when Lisa Morrissey, MPH, MSN, RN, CPHON, asked me to join her and Kathryn Barrandon, MPH, BSN, CPN, on an educational trip to Myanmar, I enthusiastically accepted.

One of the pediatric oncologists at Yangon Children’s Hospital requested solid tumor nursing education so I knew this would be a wonderful opportunity to share my years of oncology experience, especially my expertise in caring for patients with solid tumors. The experience would also give me a better global perspective of health care delivery in another part of the world.

On October 27, we set off on our 22-hour, three-leg, 8,300-mile journey from Boston to Yangon. I realize now, more than ever, that access to health care depends upon where you are born and where you live.

The day after our arrival, Lisa, Katie and I toured the oncology ward. I was astounded by the overly crowded — yet oddly quiet — patient bays, ill-looking children and desperate-yet-hopeful parents. Occasionally, a parent or patient would poke his or her head out a door or up to a window, curious about the three of us visitors. Admittedly, I was saddened by the environment.

The next day, I was relieved when we returned and were greeted by 32 energetic and excited nurses from nine hospitals across four Myanmar states. In addition to providing oncology education, our goals were to advocate for specialty nursing practice and to provide collegial support to conference attendees. …Read More