Stories about: News

‘The right thing for patients’

surgery for transgender patients

On a Monday morning in late January 2018, surgeons and clinical staff entered the operating room with one primary goal: to forever change the life of the young man who lay before them. More than 14 hours later, the team had made history, performing the first phalloplasty — surgical creation of a penis — for a transgender patient at a major U.S. pediatric hospital. …Read More

Paper Trail: Challenges for developmental-behavioral workforce, pediatric dentistry trends, implications of herpes zoster and more

Clinical research from Boston Children's

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

Implications of herpes zoster in vaccinated children

Researchers including dermatologist Jennifer Huang, MD, describe seven children without a history of primary varicella who presented with herpes zoster that correlated with the original VZV vaccination site and resolved without complications. These cases, published on Feb. 6 in Pediatric Dermatology, highlight the close correlation between the vaccination site and cutaneous eruption.

Trends in pediatric dental care use

Co-authored by Dentist-in-Chief Man Wai Ng and published in the April 2018 issue of Dental Clinics of North America, this article explores trends in three areas of pediatric dental services: access among Medicaid-enrolled children, treatment of oral health conditions, and use of emergency departments for dental needs among U.S. children.

Parents’ perceptions of their child’s health status 

The aim of this study by Nurse Scientists Kristine Maria Ruggiero and Judith A. Vessey, Associate Chief Nurse Patricia Hickey and colleagues, was to examine parents’ perceptions of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in their school-age child with congenital heart disease (CHD). The results of this study, published in the Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, are useful in providing practical recommendations in caring for children with CHDs while informing relevant policies.

Challenges for developmental-behavioral peds

In this Pediatrics paper published Feb. 16, Carolyn Bridgemohan, MD and colleagues surveyed a sample of the developmental-behavioral pediatric workforce and found it struggles to meet current service demands. Clinician burnout was reported with increased patient complexity and female subspecialists spent more time in billable and nonbillable components of clinical care.

For more clinically-actionable insights, bookmark Boston Children’s Notes blog for primary care providers.

Paper Trail: Uterine bleeding in transmasculine and nonbinary teens, opioids for severe abdominal pain, status epilepticus and more

Latest clinical research from Boston Children's

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

Status epilepticus: Should we treat it like stroke?

Status epilepticus, a state of prolonged seizures, is one of the most common pediatric neurologic emergencies, affecting 10-20% of pediatric epilepsy patients. A new study published in JAMA Neurology underscores the point that rapid treatment improves outcomes and may save lives. “Status epilepticus should be considered a time-sensitive emergency, such as a stroke or other cardiovascular events,” says Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, senior author and director of clinical epilepsy research at Boston Children’s.

Pain management in pediatric acute pancreatitis: Opioid vs. non-opioid

Nearly all patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) experience some degree of severe abdominal pain, yet strategies for pain management in AP have been poorly studied, particularly in the field of pediatrics. Gastroenterology researcher Amit Grover, MD examines the initial provision of analgesia to children who presented to a pediatric emergency department with AP. Learn more in this Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition paper.

Persistent uterine bleeding in transmasculine and nonbinary teens

The treatment of persistent uterine bleeding can be difficult in a subset of patients who identify as transmasculine or nonbinary. In this recent Transgender Health article, endocrinology researchers Stephanie Roberts, MD and Jeremi Carswell, MD review the physiology of the normal menstrual cycle and the hormonal influences on the endometrium, and explore options for the treatment of persistent bleeding for people both already on testosterone and for those who are either not ready for or who do not desire testosterone.

A practical approach to severe asthma in children

Severe asthma accounts for only a small proportion of the children with asthma, but a disproportionately high amount of resource utilization and morbidity. In a new Annals of the American Thoracic Society paper, senior author and pulmonology researcher Jonathan Gaffin, MD describes the importance of an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to treating severe asthma.

For more clinically-actionable insights, bookmark Boston Children’s Notes blog for primary care providers.

Paper Trail: Fever in children, early ACL reconstruction, hydrocephalus and more

Boy looking at medical scale

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

Fever in Children: Pearls and Pitfalls

Fever in children is a prominent concern for parents and a frequent cause of emergency department visits. Although in most instances the cause of these fevers is a mild viral illness, some children might be at risk of a more serious, life-threatening infection. Emergency Medicine researcher Baruch Krauss, MD, EdM writes about the epidemiology, measurement, meaning and clinical signs of a fever in a pediatric patient, learn more in this Children paper.


Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children

As the number of children and teens participating in competitive sports is increasing, so is the frequency of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Historically, treatment would consist of rehabilitation until the patient reached skeletal maturity, then modification would take place; however, Lyle Micheli, MD, director of our Sports Medicine Division writes that more recent evidence encourages early reconstruction. Read more about the complexities in ACL injury treatment, re-tear prevention and the debate between early and delayed modification in this Open Acess J Sports Med article.


Utilizing trauma admissions as an opportunity to identify developmental and behavioral concerns

In the pediatric population, developmental and behavioral problems tend to be underdiagnosed, and can be risk factors for injury and trauma. In a study titled “The Survey of Wellbeing of Young Children,” researcher Catherine Chen, MD, MPH assessed the opportunity that pediatric trauma admissions provide to screen patients for these developmental and behavioral concerns. Read more about their research in the American Journal of Surgery.


Growing Brains: How Adapting to Africa Advanced the Treatment of Infant Hydrocephalus

Infant hydrocephalus is an under-recognized yet prominent global health problem, with over 400,000 new infant cases a year. Of those cases, 100,000 come from Sub-Saharan Africa alone, making it a key region to analyze the pathogenesis in order to develop public health strategies for prevention. Read more about hydrocephalus and its treatment in this Clinical Neurosurgery paper written by Benjamin C. Warf, MD, Director of our Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery Program.


Disparities in epilepsy surgery in the United States of America

Tobias Loddenkemper, MD alongside other neurology researchers conducted a study to describe the epidemiology of epilepsy surgery. By analyzing the National Inpatient Sample and the Kids’ Inpatient Sample, researchers found racial disparities in both pediatric and adult admissions, more specifically an underrepresentation of Blacks in both patient pools. Find out more about their results by reading this Journal of Neurology article.

For more clinically-actionable insights, bookmark Boston Children’s Notes blog for primary care providers.