Stories about: Practice

Breaking down language barriers: Strategies for working with LEP families

Doctor sitting down to explain something to a patient with limited English proficiency

Caring for patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) is a complex process that challenges clinicians in any setting. Being able to effectively communicate is crucial to ensuring the patient’s well-being and safety. But when this process is hindered by a patient or family’s language barrier, quality of care and patient outcomes could be compromised. Even with the assistance of an interpreter, how can we ensure that LEP patients and families truly understand their education? How much health knowledge and health literacy do they need in order to effectively synthesize and apply everything they learned during an encounter? There are a number of factors to consider. …Read More

Expert’s Corner: A guide to managing knee injuries in athletes


Knee pain and injuries are common among young athletes. Although some parents may think to bring their child to the emergency department (ED) when a knee injury occurs, there are many cases when the injury is better managed by either a primary care provider (PCP) or an orthopedic specialist.

The following guide will help you manage knee pain in athletes and provide guidance on when to refer your patient to an orthopedic specialist. …Read More

Expert’s Corner: Four ways epilepsy care is changing


On May 6, clinicians and families gathered at the 2017 Clavin Conference for Family Education in Epilepsy to discuss the latest information about this condition. A major theme that emerged at the conference was that epilepsy isn’t a one-size-fits-all condition — and seizure activity can change over time as young brains develop. Because children are one of the fastest-growing groups of Americans being diagnosed with epilepsy, keeping up with the latest in clinical care for epilepsy is crucial, says Phillip Pearl, MD, director of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. Here, he shares four recent trends in the field. …Read More

Seeing esotropia? Take fast action: Q&A with ophthalmologist

Diagram showing esotropia, aka an inward-turning crossed eye
Esotropia is the term used to describe an inward-turning crossed eye.


According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, about 4 percent of children have some form of strabismus (crossed eye). In infants, the most common type of crossed eye is known as esotropia, which is when the eye or eyes turn inward.

Although it can sometimes be as simple as prescribing glasses to correct the eye’s alignment, it’s important to seek expert care early.

Early intervention can:

  • rule out any potentially serious underlying disease
  • identify appropriate treatment to quickly correct the crossed eye and
  • prevent lingering long-term effects.

Boston Children’s Ophthalmologist-in-Chief, David Hunter, MD, PhD, offers advice to pediatricians on what to do when a patient suddenly develops esotropia. …Read More