Diagnosing and treating nerve injuries in children and adolescents

Dr. Andrea Bauer nerve injuries Notes blog
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Nerve injuries in children and adolescents aren’t all that common, and may be difficult to diagnose. When these injuries do occur, the referral process can also present further complications.

“With peripheral nerve injuries, it’s common to think a patient needs a neurosurgeon or plastic surgeon,” says Andrea Bauer, MD, an orthopedic surgeon in the Hand & Orthopedic Upper Extremity Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “But because of the legacy Dr. Peter Waters has built, the specialists in our Orthopedic Center actually have a great amount of experience with these injuries.”

Bauer’s experience treating a wide range of nerve injuries both surgically and non-surgically in pediatric populations has helped her understand the difficulties that often arise in both diagnosis and treatment. Here, she provides insight on what PCPs and pediatricians should be aware of when it comes to nerve injuries in children.

…Read More

Why breastfeeding matters for mothers and children (and families) everywhere

Baby touching mother's face while breastfeeding

The recent attempt by U.S. representatives to the World Health Assembly to reduce support for global infant nutrition guidelines represents a new low in promoting global public health. World Breastfeeding Week gives us reason to review hard facts and real news about how and why to support nursing mothers and their infants. …Read More

When rectal prolapse requires a referral

colorectal

Rectal prolapse: It’s a visually alarming problem that can send worried parents straight to their child’s pediatrician, if not the emergency department. Despite its often-graphic appearance, rectal prolapse is usually benign and easily treated. Indeed, the majority of young children who experience rectal prolapse can be treated without surgery and won’t have a recurrence. …Read More

Health consequences of low energy availability in female athletes

Ackerman RED-S female athletes energy deficiency sports

For all young athletes, having the necessary energy to participate in sports — while also supporting a growing body — is imperative to their overall health. The Female Athlete Triad is a well-known consequence of low energy availability in female athletes and can result in menstrual dysfunction and decreased bone mineral density.

Recently, the focus has turned from the Triad to a more inclusive term; Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport, or “RED-S.” This syndrome also appears to be a result of low energy availability, but has health consequences other than menstrual dysfunction and bone health in females and acknowledges that relative energy deficiency can happen in males.

…Read More