Cerebral palsy: How a team approach benefits spasticity

two children with spasticity from cerebral palsy
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: DAVID CHRISOM/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Cerebral palsy (CP) is an umbrella term that can refer to several different types of brain injury and that can affect many aspects of a child’s health. For these reasons, CP is best treated by a team of clinicians from multiple disciplines, who can address the full array of related concerns. In the Cerebral Palsy and Spasticity Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, patients receive care from multiple providers in one day, which makes managing care easier on families and encourages collaboration and communication between caring physicians. …Read More

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Latest in diagnosis and treatment

Q&A about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with Partha Ghosh, MDDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy, affecting nearly 16 of every 100,000 live male births in the United States. It causes progressive muscular damage and degeneration, which results in muscle weakness, loss of ambulation, motor delays, cardiomyopathy and reduced respiratory function. …Read More

Rethinking fever: New study redefines body temperature

Researchers at Boston CHildren's Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator take new look at body temperature.
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Your first patient of the day presents with a sore throat and a temperature of 99.5 degrees. Although a little higher than normal, it’s not technically a fever, right? Jonathan Hausmann, MD, a rheumatologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, might disagree.

Hausmann, Fatma Dedeoglu, MD, and their colleagues from the Boston Children’s Hospital Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator, recently published a study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine that they hope will begin a larger dialogue among physicians and others about normal body temperature and the definition of fever. …Read More

Why expert care is crucial for aspiration

Dr. Rachel Rosen explains her new study about aspiration
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Aspiration, or the entrance of food or liquid into a child’s airway, is associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia and other swallowing problems. It is more common in premature babies and those with neurological abnormalities, although it can occur in any child. Parents typically bring their children to pediatricians when they observe choking, regurgitation, coughing and other symptoms related to feeding. …Read More