Stories about: ACL Program

Preventing ACL injuries in female athletes through neuromuscular training

acl injury prevention notes lead image

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are on the rise, with about 350,000 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction surgery in the U.S. each year — and young athletes being the fastest growing patient population. Despite advances in ACL reconstruction, the risks of re-tear and future osteoarthritis are still major areas of concern. With this in mind, many institutions have increased clinical and research efforts for ACL injury prevention — a significant area of focus for The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention at Boston Children’s Hospital. …Read More

Q+A: What you need to know about bridge-enhanced ACL repair

Screen Shot ACL repairIt’s not uncommon for physicians and patients to refer to ACL surgery as ACL repair. The current standard of care, however, does not repair a torn ACL. The surgeon removes the ends of the torn ACL and replaces the ligament with a tendon graft. It’s ACL reconstruction.

Bridge-enhanced ACL repair (BEAR) is a promising new approach to ACL surgery that uses a protein-enriched sponge to encourage the torn ends of an ACL to reconnect and heal.

Martha Murray, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital orthopedic surgeon, and a team of researchers have spent nearly 25 years developing the BEAR surgery. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a 100-patient clinical trial at Boston Children’s to see if the BEAR surgery is as effective as ACL reconstruction.

Murray answers some questions about her ACL research and the BEAR trial. …Read More

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Clinical Consult: ACL tear diagnosis and injury prevention

Sports injury ACL tear repair prevention

If your practice includes teen athletes, you’ve likely encountered at least one patient with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The incidence of ACL tears among child, teen and young adult athletes has reached near epidemic proportions: 400,000 athletes suffer a tear annually.

Primary care providers (PCPs) are often the first to detect a tear. Dennis Kramer, MD, orthopedic surgeon in Boston Children’s Hospital ACL Program, weighs in on PCPs’ role in ACL tear diagnosis and injury prevention. …Read More

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