Stories about: congenital heart disease

Paper Trail: Challenges for developmental-behavioral workforce, pediatric dentistry trends, implications of herpes zoster and more

Clinical research from Boston Children's

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

Implications of herpes zoster in vaccinated children

Researchers including dermatologist Jennifer Huang, MD, describe seven children without a history of primary varicella who presented with herpes zoster that correlated with the original VZV vaccination site and resolved without complications. These cases, published on Feb. 6 in Pediatric Dermatology, highlight the close correlation between the vaccination site and cutaneous eruption.

Trends in pediatric dental care use

Co-authored by Dentist-in-Chief Man Wai Ng and published in the April 2018 issue of Dental Clinics of North America, this article explores trends in three areas of pediatric dental services: access among Medicaid-enrolled children, treatment of oral health conditions, and use of emergency departments for dental needs among U.S. children.

Parents’ perceptions of their child’s health status 

The aim of this study by Nurse Scientists Kristine Maria Ruggiero and Judith A. Vessey, Associate Chief Nurse Patricia Hickey and colleagues, was to examine parents’ perceptions of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in their school-age child with congenital heart disease (CHD). The results of this study, published in the Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, are useful in providing practical recommendations in caring for children with CHDs while informing relevant policies.

Challenges for developmental-behavioral peds

In this Pediatrics paper published Feb. 16, Carolyn Bridgemohan, MD and colleagues surveyed a sample of the developmental-behavioral pediatric workforce and found it struggles to meet current service demands. Clinician burnout was reported with increased patient complexity and female subspecialists spent more time in billable and nonbillable components of clinical care.

For more clinically-actionable insights, bookmark Boston Children’s Notes blog for primary care providers.

Health care value, measured in crayons and chocolate

This post was originally published on the blog Collective Well

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I watched the small baby lay silently sleeping, his little body propped up in a full-sized hospital bed, dwarfed by monitors and machines and bags of medications that looked as benign as pure spring water and yet I knew were controlling most of his bodily functions including this induced sleep. His peaceful demeanor seemed so incongruous to the palpable intensity of everything around him. Despite the alarms, incessant beeping, murmur of voices and general hubbub of the ICU, he went on sleeping, utterly oblivious. In this environment, where every organ’s function is externalized and micro-managed down to each breath and each heartbeat, all medical decisions take on heightened scrutiny.

It is not hard to imagine why functional and technical measures were developed to assess patient outcomes and cost for each of these critical decisions, and how important it is to analyze those metrics to ensure these babies survive the next minute, hour, day.

We can estimate the cost of this baby’s hospitalization, but how do we measure the value?

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