Stories about: Orthopedic Center

Children with congenital hand differences exhibit better emotional health

congenital hand differences Notes blog lead image

Approximately one in every thousand children is born with a congenital upper limb difference. These conditions can include complete or partial absence of a limb, failure of fingers to separate, duplication of fingers, overgrowth and undergrowth as well as constriction ring syndrome. Along with the physical differences this presents as a child grows and develops, there can also be mental and emotional challenges.

A recent study led by Donald S. Bae, MD, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in the Hand and Upper Extremity Program at Boston Children’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, evaluated the physical level of function as well as the mental and emotional health of almost 600 children with congenital upper limb differences. Ultimately, the study found that while children with congenital hand differences had decreased upper limb function, they have better peer relationships and positive emotional states compared to population norms.

…Read More

Expert’s Corner: Caring for patellofemoral instability in athletes

patellofemoral instability lead image

Dislocation or subluxation of the patella or “kneecap” is a common acute injury for young athletes, especially in sports and activities such as basketball, football, lacrosse, gymnastics and dance. These injuries may be routinely observed in clinic, and depending on severity, may warrant a referral to a pediatric orthopedic specialist.

The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to both the condition in which an individual experiences a traumatic dislocation of their patella, and the general instability that a patient can feel or a physician may observe upon examination. In both cases, there are observations that may be made or treatments that can be provided that may reduce the risk of a dislocation event occurring in the future, as well as protect a young athlete from further damage.

Notes talked to Matthew Milewski, MD, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in Boston Children’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, about how to best care for young athletes with patellofemoral instability.

…Read More

Reducing cast-saw injuries through simple simulation

cast saw image for notes blog

Casting is a fundamental technique within orthopedics that is used to fix fractures, help patients with deformities, and immobilize a limb after surgery. For a physician, it’s imperative to not only know how to apply the cast appropriately, but also how to remove it safely.

During cast removal, a cast saw can heat up to the point where it injures the patient by burning their skin. This often results in further, expensive clinical care. But more importantly, it is a painful and avoidable injury to the patient.

Donald S. Bae, MD, an orthopedic surgeon in Boston Children’s Orthopedic Center, is the lead author on an article published in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery that details how a simple simulation program dramatically reduced cast-saw injuries. …Read More

Paper Trail: Injection drug use, cast-saw burns, LGBTQ bullying prevention and more

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

This edition of Paper Trail focuses on injection drug use and street-involved youth, cast-saw reduction rates, sleep apnea, LGBTQ bullying prevention and more. …Read More