Stories about: Orthopedic Center

Paper Trail: Injection drug use, cast-saw burns, LGBTQ bullying prevention and more

Paper-Trail-clinical-research-September

Boston Children’s Hospital is at the forefront of clinical research. Stay connected with Paper Trail — a monthly feature highlighting recently published outcomes data and new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pediatric illnesses.

This edition of Paper Trail focuses on injection drug use and street-involved youth, cast-saw reduction rates, sleep apnea, LGBTQ bullying prevention and more. …Read More

Hip pain in young athletes: Q&A with a sports medicine specialist

hip pain athletes

When a young athlete visits their pediatrician or primary care provider (PCP) with hip pain, the proper course of treatment isn’t always clear. The damage caused by acute and traumatic hip injuries can often be determined in imaging, while overuse injuries may be more difficult to diagnose.

For significant injuries requiring surgical intervention, it’s always in the best interest of a young athlete to be immediately referred to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. But for nagging hip pain that doesn’t have a discernible cause, the best course of action may not be evident.

Notes talked to Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH, orthopedic surgeon and associate director of the Sports Medicine Division at Boston Children’s Hospital, about how to best handle hip pain in young athletes. …Read More

Expert’s Corner: A guide to managing knee injuries in athletes

knee-pain

Knee pain and injuries are common among young athletes. Although some parents may think to bring their child to the emergency department (ED) when a knee injury occurs, there are many cases when the injury is better managed by either a primary care provider (PCP) or an orthopedic specialist.

The following guide will help you manage knee pain in athletes and provide guidance on when to refer your patient to an orthopedic specialist. …Read More

Challenging case: ABC tumor of the cervical spine

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The case

After sustaining an apparent neck injury during a routine soccer fall, a 12-year-old presented to a local hospital emergency room. An MRI was ordered and indicated an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) tumor in her cervical spine.

The patient was transferred from the local emergency room to the Boston Children’s Hospital Emergency Department.

A CT confirmed the original diagnosis and showed a fracture and erosion of her C-5 vertebra.

Guidelines for ABC tumors in long bones often recommend sclerotherapy prior to surgery. Initially, one recommendation was that the patient undergo sclerotherapy to shrink the tumor, and then undergo surgery to remove the remaining tumor in the future.

The patient was extremely active and eager to have surgery and begin rehabilitation. Her family asked for other options. …Read More