Stories about: patient experience

Gender identity & pronoun use: A guide for pediatric health care professionals

Pronoun-Lead

Everyone has a gender identity. Some people identify as cisgender — a gender that corresponds with the sex they were assigned at birth. While others identify with a gender that is different from what they were assigned at birth.

Regardless of a person’s sex assigned at birth, a person may identify as a woman, a man, both, neither or they may be gender fluid (switch between genders). In a healthcare setting, respecting a patient’s gender identity and asking about the name and pronouns they use is a crucial element of good clinical care. …Read More

Nursing and patient experience: Six lessons learned after 42 years

Susan Shaw offers words of wisdom after 42 years of caring for children and families.

Recently retired as Vice President, Associate Chief of Nursing and Director of Clinical Operations at Boston Children’s Hospital, Susan Shaw discusses the power of patient experience and shares lessons learned from her 42-year career working with children and families. …Read More

Health care value, measured in crayons and chocolate

This post was originally published on the blog Collective Well

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I watched the small baby lay silently sleeping, his little body propped up in a full-sized hospital bed, dwarfed by monitors and machines and bags of medications that looked as benign as pure spring water and yet I knew were controlling most of his bodily functions including this induced sleep. His peaceful demeanor seemed so incongruous to the palpable intensity of everything around him. Despite the alarms, incessant beeping, murmur of voices and general hubbub of the ICU, he went on sleeping, utterly oblivious. In this environment, where every organ’s function is externalized and micro-managed down to each breath and each heartbeat, all medical decisions take on heightened scrutiny.

It is not hard to imagine why functional and technical measures were developed to assess patient outcomes and cost for each of these critical decisions, and how important it is to analyze those metrics to ensure these babies survive the next minute, hour, day.

We can estimate the cost of this baby’s hospitalization, but how do we measure the value?

…Read More

Does this nurse know my child? Continuity of nursing care in the PICU: Challenges and opportunities

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When Jennifer Baird, PhD, MSW, RN, set out to study best practices in nursing in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), she didn’t know where the project would take her. “I intentionally left it open-ended,” she explains. “It was essentially an ethnographic study; I observed interactions between nurses and families over the course of a year, and also interviewed them separately.”

Baird, who is finishing up her Harvard-Wide Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital, conducted her research in 2013 at a hospital in the Los Angeles, California area. Even though it wasn’t an explicit question, every single family brought up the subject of nursing continuity. “There was a story there,” says Baird, who published her findings this spring in Nursing Research, “And I needed to follow it.”

The story turned out to be complicated. …Read More