Stories about: patient experience

Leveraging CRM tools to improve patient and family experience

Up close photo of a child with wording "putting patients first"

Many parents have hectic schedules, from shuttling their kids between extracurricular activities to helping construct this year’s science fair project. With so many balls in the air, it’s easy to let commitments slip, whether it’s a PTA meeting or a physician appointment. Simply helping families schedule an appointment isn’t enough. Patients and caregivers deserve prompt, clear messaging and reminders to keep physician appointments top of mind.

To help improve the patient and family experience, Boston Children’s Hospital recently established a digital transformation initiative. Here, Bill Gagnon, senior director of digital marketing, explains how the hospital created a personalized, streamlined digital experience for parents and their providers. …Read More

Breaking down language barriers: Strategies for working with LEP families

Doctor sitting down to explain something to a patient with limited English proficiency

Caring for patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) is a complex process that challenges clinicians in any setting. Being able to effectively communicate is crucial to ensuring the patient’s well-being and safety. But when this process is hindered by a patient or family’s language barrier, quality of care and patient outcomes could be compromised. Even with the assistance of an interpreter, how can we ensure that LEP patients and families truly understand their education? How much health knowledge and health literacy do they need in order to effectively synthesize and apply everything they learned during an encounter? There are a number of factors to consider. …Read More

Gender identity & pronoun use: A guide for pediatric health care professionals

Pronoun-Lead

Everyone has a gender identity. Some people identify as cisgender — a gender that corresponds with the sex they were assigned at birth. While others identify with a gender that is different from what they were assigned at birth.

Regardless of a person’s sex assigned at birth, a person may identify as a woman, a man, both, neither or they may be gender fluid (switch between genders). In a healthcare setting, respecting a patient’s gender identity and asking about the name and pronouns they use is a crucial element of good clinical care. …Read More

Nursing and patient experience: Six lessons learned after 42 years

Susan Shaw offers words of wisdom after 42 years of caring for children and families.

Recently retired as Vice President, Associate Chief of Nursing and Director of Clinical Operations at Boston Children’s Hospital, Susan Shaw discusses the power of patient experience and shares lessons learned from her 42-year career working with children and families. …Read More